Digging smart - time can be saved!!

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With widespread use of digital beepers and increased attendance at beeper training courses, search times for self contained rescues have decreased significantly. So recreational skiers are doing better at rescue techniques in advance of the rescue services arriving on the scene.  But the digging phase remains the most time-consuming part of an avalanche rescue. Being quicker at digging offers potential for reducing overall rescue times and increasing survival.

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In-Resort Programmes Winter Season 2015/16

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Clare

Henry Schniewind, founder of Henry's Avalanche Talk (HAT), and off-piste ski guide, is an internationally renowned snow & avalanche expert, who studied avalanche forecasting as part of a geology degree in the US and then moved to the French Alps.  He has given over 1000 talks and courses in the last 25 years, including presenting at international snow science conferences.  He has published many papers and articles - often in the British press.
off piste avalanche Henry's Avalanche Talk
off piste avalanche Henry's Avalanche Talk
off piste avalanche Henry's Avalanche Talk
off piste avalanche Henry's Avalanche Talk
off piste avalanche Henry's Avalanche Talk

What is "going a little bit" off-piste. Is it safe?

Picture Credit: Chris Souillac

A little bit of off-piste

Skiers and boarders know there is a risk from avalanches if they go off piste.  For many this means they will only go off piste with a guide and will not venture into the backcountry without professional help. And if you have no training and do not have a lot of experience of going off-piste, this is a very wise precaution.  On the other hand many people go and do "a little bit of off-piste".  It is commonly thought that nipping off the side of the piste is just fine.

Risk Management - Munter 3x3 Risk Reduction

For the attached PDF summary (from the home page) click on the "read full article" tab below

For those of you gearing up for off piste sking this season in the Southern Hemisphere, those of you who have finished the winter season and reflecting on ways to continue to have fun and be safe off-piste and touring..

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